“The Good Life”

Has anyone read this great book by Helen and Scott Nearing?  A wonderful true account of two people living a simple life, growing their own food.   A lot of good information on gardening and storing food.

One comment I particularly liked was about the nutrition of raw sunflower seeds:

“The people of East Europe, who are noted for their good teeth, consume an enormous amount of sunflower and squash seeds, cracking shells with their teeth, and thus presumably getting some of the minerals contained in the shells as well as in the kernels.   Whole, entire, raw seeds, with the protein of the germ, the fat in the oil, the starch in the kernel and the minerals distributed through the protective covering, will provide a fairly rounded diet….”  (page 124, The Good Life).

I also liked the description of why whole grain flour is so much more nutritious that white flour, stored on the shelf in supermarkets.

“For a long time, humans stored their grains whole, as they came from the threshing floor.   The grain, if dry, kept indefinitely, and because of the hard shell which covered each kernel, lost little of its nutritive value.   Wholemeal flour, however, will not keep.   Oxidation alters its chemical character.   The oil in the kernel becomes rancid or evaporates.   In a comparatively short time wholegrain flour becomes sour and moldy.   Therefore, under ideal conditions, when bread is to be baked, the whole grain should be ground.  The law in regard to milling and baking should provide that none but whole-grain flour be used and the whole-grain flour used in any bakery should be ground by suitable millers in that same bakery on the morning of the same day in which the baking takes place.  For home use the fresh flour could be delivered daily as milk is distributed.”     (page 125 The Good Life)

Wow.   Wouldn’t it be great if we could have fresh ground grain delivered to our door?  You CAN use fresh ground grain, of all kinds, e.g. brown rice, buckwheat, quinoa, millet, wheat, spelt, garbanzo, etc. by purchasing a grain mill, either electric or hand powered.  I have an electric one and make all of my own flours.  I do save time by making a batch of many different kinds at a time and freezing them in glass containers in the freezer.  I love to make fresh quick breads with garbanzo flour or a combination of the garbanzo flour and a grain, for that quality protein.  Spelt is my first choice for muffins, pies and quick breads as it is an ancient grain and much less likely to cause problems for people.  Some gluten sensitive people can use spelt without difficulty.

Onion Bread (Custom)This Onion Braid was made with freshly ground flour, and the recipe is in my Eat Away Illness book.  I have to confess I didn’t make it, my son did.

Please consider purchasing a grain mill to upgrade your nutrition to a new level.  And check the archives in this blog for many recipes using whole grain or legume flours.

Improve your health one step at a time!

Blessings,

Paulette.

Advertisements

2 Responses to “The Good Life”

  1. Fiona Beal says:

    Hi Paulette,
    I was wondering where you recommend shopping for a grain mill and what brand did you purchase?
    Fiona Beal

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    • Hi Fiona;
      I am using a Blendtec and love it. It makes 18 cups of flour; and does a good job of grinding legumes such as chickpeas. The first two I purchased were Magic Mills from Bosch, but no longer on the market. I gave them to my children, who use them. I bought mine when Bosch went out of business here in Saskatoon, but you can purchase them online, and sometimes the price is less than what I paid. A family by the name of Witzaney, who have a farm and sell products at the Saskatoon Farmer’s Market used to sell these Blendtecs, so check it out. Please let me know so I can pass the info on to others.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: