Nutrients for Thyroid health

June 9, 2016

Thank you to all who attended my presentation on Women’s Health at the Farmer’s Market on Sunday, especially the men!!!  I promised I would post a list of some of the nutrients important for thyroid health, and the foods that contain them.

Key Nutrients for Thyroid Function:

(I recommend pasture raised meats, particularly if using organ meats like the liver, organic and pasture raised eggs and dairy, and wild fish products)

Iron – red meat, particularly organ meats, nutritional yeast, dark leafy greens, lentils, pumpkin seeds.

Iodine – sea vegetables (nori, kelp, and dulse), shrimp, milk, eggs, seafood, navy beans, strawberries.

Tyrosine – meat, fish, shellfish, and poultry, eggs, yogurt, pumpkin seeds, avocados.

Zinc – oysters, red meat, particularly organ meats, pumpkin seeds.

Selenium – brazil nuts, meat, fish, shellfish, and poultry.

Vitamin E – sunflower seeds, almonds, dark leafy greens, avocados.

Vitamin B2 – dark leafy greens, yogurt, crimini mushrooms, asparagus.

Vitamin B3 – chicken, turkey, nutritional yeast.

Vitamin B6 – poultry, red meat, particularly organ meats, nutritional yeast.

Vitamin C – papaya, bell peppers, broccoli, brussel sprouts, oranges, pineapple.

Vitamin D – salmon, milk, egg yolks, mushrooms, THE SUN.

Vitamin A (as beta carotene) – sweet potatoes, carrots, dark leafy greens, squash, red peppers.

Vitamin A (as retinol) – liver, cod liver oil (fermented is better), egg yolks, butter.

(reference:  http://www.holisticnutritionlab.com)

Make a list of foods that you like from the above and regularly include them in your meal planning and grocery shopping.    They contribute to proper production of thyroid hormones.

Find recipes that you like to help with changing your regular choices, for example, try the Sweet Potato Brownie in the September 2015 blog post.

Sweet Potato Brownies 3CSNN Cert Mark (Custom)

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Thank you!

June 1, 2016

A big thanks to all of you who sent kind words of support for the nomination.   A huge thank you to Gwen for nominating me!  The winner of the first annual Lifetime Achievement Award was Lisa Tsakos, truly a forerunner in this field of nutrition.  I met her in 1999 when I was in Toronto for my graduation, and she inspired me then, as she still does!   Congratulations to her!

The conference was truly unbelievable.  It was said “We are changing the face of health care in Canada” and so we are!

“You are always moving ahead to health or away from health”.  Quote from Josh Gitalis.

I am so pleased to be a part of this organization, and feel truly blessed to have been part of many clients’  healing processes.  Several of the speakers confirmed my belief, and my personal experience, and that is that we CAN heal autoimmune!  So I encourage any of you with an autoimmune disease, such as MS, Lupus, Schleroderma, Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, etc. to get off the couch, get some help from a registered holistic nutritionist, and get better!

Many of you may remember that the markers for lupus in my blood, measured by the rheumatologist, were no longer there in January 2014.  I heard several stories similar to this at the conference, one being MS, and one being Scleroderma, both long standing.

I will be doing a talk on Autoimmunity for the Lupus chapter here in Saskatoon in October 2016.

As well, remember, this weekend, June 5th, I will be at the Farmer’s Market at 3:30p.m. to present on Women’s Health. Register with Intuitive Path Superfoods.

Remember to eat something orange today!  Check back in my blog for several pumpkin recipes.

 

Pumpkin 2015 (Custom)


Nominated for Lifetime Achievement Award and Julie Danyluk Award!!

May 24, 2016

I am so grateful to be nominated for the above two awards at the Canadian School Of Natural Nutrition Alumni conference this weekend in Toronto!  Competition is fierce as there are several of us nominated who have worked hard at educating the public about healing the body through natural nutrition and lifestyle, through writing books, doing public speaking, and much more.

Award Badge 2016


“The Good Life”

November 23, 2015

Has anyone read this great book by Helen and Scott Nearing?  A wonderful true account of two people living a simple life, growing their own food.   A lot of good information on gardening and storing food.

One comment I particularly liked was about the nutrition of raw sunflower seeds:

“The people of East Europe, who are noted for their good teeth, consume an enormous amount of sunflower and squash seeds, cracking shells with their teeth, and thus presumably getting some of the minerals contained in the shells as well as in the kernels.   Whole, entire, raw seeds, with the protein of the germ, the fat in the oil, the starch in the kernel and the minerals distributed through the protective covering, will provide a fairly rounded diet….”  (page 124, The Good Life).

I also liked the description of why whole grain flour is so much more nutritious that white flour, stored on the shelf in supermarkets.

“For a long time, humans stored their grains whole, as they came from the threshing floor.   The grain, if dry, kept indefinitely, and because of the hard shell which covered each kernel, lost little of its nutritive value.   Wholemeal flour, however, will not keep.   Oxidation alters its chemical character.   The oil in the kernel becomes rancid or evaporates.   In a comparatively short time wholegrain flour becomes sour and moldy.   Therefore, under ideal conditions, when bread is to be baked, the whole grain should be ground.  The law in regard to milling and baking should provide that none but whole-grain flour be used and the whole-grain flour used in any bakery should be ground by suitable millers in that same bakery on the morning of the same day in which the baking takes place.  For home use the fresh flour could be delivered daily as milk is distributed.”     (page 125 The Good Life)

Wow.   Wouldn’t it be great if we could have fresh ground grain delivered to our door?  You CAN use fresh ground grain, of all kinds, e.g. brown rice, buckwheat, quinoa, millet, wheat, spelt, garbanzo, etc. by purchasing a grain mill, either electric or hand powered.  I have an electric one and make all of my own flours.  I do save time by making a batch of many different kinds at a time and freezing them in glass containers in the freezer.  I love to make fresh quick breads with garbanzo flour or a combination of the garbanzo flour and a grain, for that quality protein.  Spelt is my first choice for muffins, pies and quick breads as it is an ancient grain and much less likely to cause problems for people.  Some gluten sensitive people can use spelt without difficulty.

Onion Bread (Custom)This Onion Braid was made with freshly ground flour, and the recipe is in my Eat Away Illness book.  I have to confess I didn’t make it, my son did.

Please consider purchasing a grain mill to upgrade your nutrition to a new level.  And check the archives in this blog for many recipes using whole grain or legume flours.

Improve your health one step at a time!

Blessings,

Paulette.


Date Filled Cookies! and ebooks of What Your Doctor Doesn’t Tell You About Foods!

January 24, 2014

After many requests, I’ve decided to give you the recipe for these yummy cookies, found in my latest release What Your Doctor Doesn’t Tell You About Foods, Book Two. I have made dozens of these little treats over the last few months, for my family and friends, and for my presentations in promoting my books.

The three books that were released this year are now available on my website as a PDF download, for $7.99 each, What Your Doctor Doesn’t Tell You About Foods, book one, two, and three. You may also print the order form and receive all 5 books with no shipping charges, for a limited time offer.

DATE FILLED COOKIES

It is easy to grind the raw almonds or hazelnuts quickly in a Magic Bullet or blender, or even a coffee grinder. This is much fresher than the bought Almond Flour.
This recipe makes about 30 to 36 single cookies or 15 to 18 when stacked with the date filling.

4 cups finely ground nuts (I use almonds or hazelnuts)
1/3 cup melted butter
1/4 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. unrefined sea salt
1/2 cup liquid honey

Filling:
1 lb. pitted dates
1/3 cup water
1 tbsp. lemon juice

1. Mix all ingredients well.
2. Roll into small balls, about 1″ in diameter.
3. Place on parchment paper on a cookie sheet, or an oiled sheet and press balls into flat cookies with the back of a buttered teaspoon.
4. Bake at 300 degrees F. until lightly golden brown, about 13 minutes. Do not overbake.
5. Cool for 5 minutes, and then gently remove from pan to cool further.
6. Put water, dates and lemon juice in a saucepan and gently heat, stirring often, until a paste.
7. Spread between two cookies.
8. Place cookies in a closed container and keep in the fridge or freezer.

Do not feel guilty about enjoying these nutritious morsels!

In Health,
Paulette.


Cast Iron Cooking!!!

September 18, 2013

The time has come to talk about the joy of cooking with cast iron!

Over the years I have collected large and small cast iron pans and grills of various shapes. I scour the garage sales for the old dark black cast iron, with a smooth cooking surface. The new ones just don’t seem to work so well.

My cast iron are my favorite cooking utensils, and are extremely versatile. They can be used on the stovetop, in the oven or on the grill, and allow the cook to make everything imaginable, even pies and pizzas. Cast iron heats evenly and cooks evenly. Handles are hot, so I keep those little bitty mitty things near the stove to place over the handles. The importance of reducing toxic chemicals in our diet is aided with cast iron by eliminating all of those nonstick versions of cookware available. Cast iron can be placed on very hot surfaces, and it holds the heat for a very long time, compared with other materials. Recently I made a 7 pound roast chicken in one of the newer red porcelain coated cast iron roasters. I was amazed at the wonderful moist texture of the chicken, and the reduced time it took to cook.

Another benefit of cast iron is the possibility of some of the iron being transferred into the food during cooking. Many people suffer from iron deficiency, causing fatigue and lack of energy, so every little bit helps.

Wash your cast iron well when you receive it and then season it. Seasoning helps to bake the tiny oil particles into the porous surface, creating a smooth nonstick surface. This also reduces rusting, and prevents food from taking on any undesirable flavour.

Seasoning: wipe your pan down with a thin layer of olive oil, inside and out, including the handle. I like to use my Lecithin Pan Coating, which is 1 cup of olive oil mixed with 1 tsp. of liquid lecithin. (from Cook Your Way to Health). Liquid Lecithin is available at health food stores and keeps in the cupboard with no expiry date. There are various suggestions for baking this finish on. I suggest to place your pan in a 300 F. oven for 1 hour. One source suggests you place it upside down on a cookie sheet. Turn the heat off and leave it sit in the oven until cool, then wipe it with a paper towel. Highly acidic foods such as tomatoes and vinegar may remove some of this seasoning; my solution is to gently clean the pan after I have removed whatever casserole I am cooking, dry it well with a soft cloth, place it over a warm burner on the stove, and brush a thin layer of the Lecithin Pan Coating over the cooking surface. I allow it to heat gently and then turn off the burner. I find this preserves the coating and maintains a better nonstick surface. Should you have egg or other foods stuck to the pan, soak it in hot water for a few minutes, or place on a burner with the water and simmer gently. Use a brush or nonabrasive scrubber to remove food particles and then follow the drying and oiling procedure. Takes very little time and is well worth the effort. Never wash it with soap after it has been seasoned, or put it in the dishwasher, as this may cause rusting. Place a paper towel over the surface after it has cooled, and store in the oven or other warm dry place, allowing air to circulate and prevent condensation.

Cast iron gets better with age! In fact, it will live longer than you…..

Why not try a casserole in a cast iron pan today? Below is a version of an easy hamburger casserole given to me by my friend Joy.

PAKISTANI KIMA

3 tbsp. butter

1 cup chopped onion

1 clove garlic, minced

1 lb. ground beef

1 tbsp. curry powder

1 ½ tbsp. unrefined sea salt

dash pepper

dash cinnamon

dash ginger

dash turmeric

2 cups canned diced tomatoes

2 cups green beans

1. Place butter, onion and garlic in a large cast iron pan and saute briefly.

2. Add ground beef or bison and brown well.

3. Stir in the curry powder, salt, pepper, cinnamon, ginger and turmeric.

4. Add the tomatoes and beans and simmer, covered for 25 minutes.

Why not heat this in the morning and pack in a thermos to send off to school or work for lunch?

Paulette.

Paulette Millis
Author, Speaker & Registered Nutritional Consultant
www.EatAwayIllness.com


The Joy of Organic Turkeys!

September 25, 2012

Does anyone else do this???? Every fall I purchase these wonderful organic turkeys, fresh, and cut them into meal size servings to freeze. Having turkey breast steaks during the winter is so wonderful. Or roasting one large turkey leg, which serves 2 people, knowing you have the ultimate in healthy protein, no antibiotics or growth hormones, and all you have to do is walk to your freezer and remove one leg! It is so convenient, and ensures our quality protein consumption throughout the winter. Imagine the usual weekly searching for quality poultry at supermarkets and coming up with, at best, ‘free run’ birds. I am so grateful that here in Saskatchewan we have so many consciousness farmers growing good quality food. Knowing the farmer means I know that the turkeys I purchase had free access to fresh air, sunshine, and foraging, rather than a small area, and/or small amount of time seeing the daylight, thus legally allowing the grower to call the turkeys ‘free run’.

Two of my friends joined me this fall in learning how to cut up these big birds for freezing. What fun! Thank you to Gwen and Colleen for being so brave, and wielding those big knives. We had an audience in the form of one new immigrant from China, who was aghast at the thought of purchasing large amounts of turkey, and freezing it for the years use. She hovered over us, exclaiming, without the use of English, not to harm ourselves with the knives.

Thank you to Laureen LaBrash of Lumsden for our turkeys! Here is a recipe idea that Colleen gave me; it is delicious.

Sauteed Turkey Nuggets:

Cut turkey breast into nugget size, about 1 – 2″ in diameter.
Lightly coat with brown rice flour.
Roll in beaten egg.
Lightly coat again with brown rice flour.
Saute in coconut oil in medium hot saute pan until lightly browned.
Sprinkle crushed rosemary and balsamic vinegar over cubes, stirring to combine.
Serve with a fresh salad and roasted baby potatoes.

Enjoy!

Paulette Millis
Author, Speaker & Registered Nutritional Consultant
www.EatAwayIllness.com